About Chancellor Folt

Biography

WHEN CAROL L. FOLT became Carolina’s 11th Chancellor, and 29th in the lineage of leaders that dates back to Carolina’s founding, she said: “As America’s first public university, Carolina became the gold standard. The founders passed the baton, and the future is up to us. How can we fulfill this honorable charge in a way that is ever fresh and relevant?”

Folt – an internationally recognized life scientist, award-winning teacher and accomplished academic leader – has worked to fulfill that honorable charge by placing Carolina’s students at the center, advancing the university’s academic excellence, championing Carolina as a leading global public research university and focusing on innovation through the development of new avenues for entrepreneurship that are translating world-class ideas into real-world applications. Folt has said she remains confident in the future of higher education because she has never stopped believing in the enduring power of a college education to transform lives.

Since her arrival, the chancellor has made planning for Carolina’s future a top priority. In the fall of 2017, The Blueprint for Next, Carolina’s strategic framework outlining priorities to guide decision-making and investments during the next decade, moved to the implementation phase. Shaped over several years by hundreds of people who shared their ideas about what the university is and their dreams of what it can become, the framework spans all university schools and departments. Its core elements are succinctly written and focused so it can be captured on a single page. The Blueprint for Nextembodies the same sense of hope and possibility that was present when Carolina’s founders created the country’s first public university and it captures an underlying quality about Carolina – The university’s willingness to continually reinvent itself.

In August 2017, Carolina welcomed 4,373 first-year students, the largest and most academically accomplished class in its 224-year history. Once again selected from a record pool of applicants, the Class of 2021 was the largest first-year class in Carolina’s 224-history. Almost 80 percent of the class ranked in the top 10-percent of their high school class. The class of 2021 also had the largest number of military-affiliated students in the university’s history.

Carolina is one of the nation’s top ten research universities and ranks 6th in the nation in overall federal research and development. The university surpassed, for the first time, $1 billion in annual research expenditures in 2017.

Folt leads the university in the national dialogue about issues facing higher education, inclusion and diversity, protecting students from sexual assault and promoting the advancement of women in STEM fields and academic leadership. She has championed key diversity initiatives to make campus more inclusive and built a high-performing cabinet, including women and minority leaders with significant leadership experience in key positions. As Folt has said, “As a scientist, I’ve never seen an answer to a problem come from a group that all looked the same and thought the same.”

Under Folt’s leadership and following a third-consecutive record fundraising year in August 2017, Carolina kicked off For All Kind: the Campaign for Carolina, the most ambitious fundraising campaign in the university’s history. The goal of the capital campaign is to raise $4.25 billion by Dec. 31, 2022, to create programs dedicated to student potential, faculty excellence, innovative teaching, experience-based learning and pioneering research to prepare graduates for success. This bold effort carries enormous opportunity and responsibility, with every single dollar to be used for the public good.

The capital campaign includes raising $1 billion in scholarships and aid to fund Carolina Edge, the biggest initiative in the university’s history, to make good on the university’s promise to remain of and for the public. To recognize the nation’s service people, a part of the recently launched capital campaign – called the Red, White and Carolina Blue Challenge – focuses on raising $20 million in support of need-based scholarship opportunities for students from military families.

Inspired by the transformational impact that the arts made in her life and work as a scientist, Folt initiated and has led the Arts Everywherepan-university initiative. At Carolina, Arts Everywherecelebrates the multifaceted power of the arts to illuminate the human condition, allow for reflection, promote dialogue and provoke action. Rooted in the fundamental belief that the arts are for everyone – regardless of skill level or background – the university community is encouraged to take part in the creative process and to explore the full range of the visual, performing and literary arts. As part of Arts Everywhere, the university community is reimagining diverse campus spaces as creative hubs. From residence halls to research labs, Carolina is animating the unexpected through transformative installations, co-creative opportunities and performances.

Under the chancellor’s leadership, Carolina also has continued to improve on the school’s winning track record of undergraduate diversity, retention and graduation rates – particularly for low-income, first-generation and underrepresented students – while moving forward with additional emphasis on Carolina’s historic commitment to ensuring affordability together with accessibility and excellence. Carolina is one of the few public universities that remains both need-blind and covers the full financial need of its students. Carolina is the least expensive of 14 peer public universities and debt-per-student, just over half of the U.S. average, has remained nearly flat in inflation-adjusted dollars for more than a decade.

Carolina routinely ranks among the nation’s top public universities and is noted as one of the best values in college education. Folt believes it is a moral imperative for universities to seek out talent and find a way for talented, committed students to thrive within higher education. One example is the Chancellor’s Science Scholar initiative. Folt began this program when she arrived at Carolina to provide financial and academic support to encourage talented underrepresented students to pursue advanced degrees in science or mathematics. The first-cohort of Chancellor’s Science Scholar graduated in May 2017.

As leader of North Carolina’s flagship public university, Folt and her leadership team champion attracting, developing and retaining world-class faculty that are focused on excellence in teaching and research. Carolina’s faculty lead by doing, and each day they share their knowledge and excitement with the next generation who will face a rapidly evolving future as they embark upon impactful careers, many in fields that don’t exist today. Carolina is committed to benefiting its local and state communities and to cultivating the global outlook of its students, with more than a third of Carolina undergraduate students studying abroad – one of highest rates among public universities.

Folt came to Carolina from Dartmouth College, where she was interim president in 2012-2013 and served as a faculty member in the Department of Biological Sciences and academic leader. As a widely respected scientist, Folt and her students’ pioneering work on the effects of dietary mercury and arsenic on human and ecosystem health led to numerous changes in national and global policy and consumption advisories around the world. Folt graduated from the University of California, Santa Barbara, earning both a bachelor’s degree in aquatic biology and a master’s degree in biology. She received her doctorate from the University of California, Davis and undertook a postdoctoral fellowship at Michigan State University before joining the faculty at Dartmouth.

When asked about the future, Folt said that while so much has been accomplished at the nation’s first public university, the best is yet to come. She then smiled, and said, “I know this because I witness it on campus every day. The future is studying in our classrooms, working in our labs and serving our communities right now. I couldn’t be more proud and optimistic.”

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Curriculum Vitae

Carol L. Folt, PhD
Chancellor, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

ACADEMIC EXPERIENCE
Chancellor, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
2012    Interim President, Dartmouth
2010    Provost, Dartmouth
2010    Associate Director, Center for Children’s Environmental Health at Dartmouth 1997 Professor of Biological Sciences, Dartmouth
2009    Acting Provost, Dartmouth
2004    Dean of Faculty, Dartmouth
2001    Dean of Graduate Studies, Dartmouth
2001    Associate Dean of the Faculty for Interdisciplinary Programs
2000    Associate Director, Dartmouth Center for Environmental Health Sciences
1998    Associate Director, Dartmouth Toxic Metals Research Program
1991    Associate Professor, Department of Biological Sciences, Dartmouth
1984    Assistant Professor, Department of Biological Sciences, Dartmouth
1983    Research Instructor, Department of Biological Sciences, Dartmouth
1982    Postdoctoral Fellow at W.K. Kellogg Biological Station, Michigan State
1981    Lecturer at University of California, Davis

SELECTED HONORS, AWARDS & ELECTED OFFICES
2010    Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, Biological Sciences
2010    Member Board of Trustees, Cary Institute of Ecosystem Studies 2008 Member of Board of Directors, Sherman Fairchild Foundation
2007    Endowed Professorship – The Dartmouth Professor of Biological Sciences
2002    Elected Officer American Society of Limnology & Oceanography Member-at-Large (3 year term)
1996    Member Board of Trustees, Montshire Museum of Science. VT (6 year term)
1991    J. Kenneth Huntington Memorial Prize for Excellence in Teaching and Research
1991    Elected Officer Ecological Society of America: Chair & Vice-Chair, Aquatic Section (4 year term)

SPONSORED RESEARCH GRANTS
2000 – Present

2014 NIEHS (P010 and USPEP (RD) – “The Children’s Environmental Health and Disease Prevention Research Center at Dartmouth” Margaret Karagas (PI); Carol Folt (Associate Director)

2012 NIEHS and USPEP (xxx) – Project Center grant: “Water and Dietary Arsenic Exposure Related to Early Growth and Neurodevelopment,”Kathy Cottingham (PI), Susan Korrick, Diane Gilbert-Diamond,

2010 NIEHS (P20) – “Center for Children’s Environmental Health at Dartmouth” Margaret Karagas (PI); Carol Folt (Associate Director)

2010 NIEHS – “Food borne exposure to arsenic during the first year of life” Kathy Cottingham (PI), Tracy Punshon (Co-PI), Carol Folt (Co-PI), Margaret Karagas (Co-PI) (individual project in program)

2008-10 NIEHS – “Toxic Metals in the Northeast: From Biological to Environmental Implications” Bruce Stanton (PI), Carol Folt (Associate Director), Margaret Karagas (Associate Director)

2008-13 NIEHS – “Bioaccumulation and Trophic Transfer of Toxic Hg in Aquatic Food Webs” Celia Chen (PI), Carol Folt (Co-PI), Robert Mason (Co-PI)

2009-10 USDA – “Effects of Landscape and Climate Change on Mercury Accumulation in Aquatic Ecosystems of the Northern Forest Region” Carol Folt (PI), Darren Ward (Co- PI)

2005-08 NIEHS – “Toxic Metals in the Northeast: From Biological to Environmental Implications” Joshua Hamilton (PI), Carol Folt (Associate Director), Bruce Stanton (Associate Director)

2005-08 NIEHS – “Trophic Transfer of Toxic Metals in Aquatic Food Webs” Carol Folt (PI), Celia Chen (Co-PI) (individual project in program)

2005-08 NIEHS – “Training Core” Carol Folt (Project Leader) (individual project in program)

2002-07 NSF – “Development of Methods Linking Genomic and Ecological Responses in a Freshwater Sentinel Species” Joshua Hamilton (PI), Celia Chen (Co-PI), Carol Folt (Co- PI), Joseph Shaw (Co-PI), Michael Lynch (Co-PI)

2002 NSF – “Acquisition of a Gas Chromatography Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry System for Interdisciplinary Environmental and Health Science Research at Dartmouth College” Xiahong Feng (PI), Carol Folt (Co-PI), Stefan Stürup (Co-PI)

2000-05 NIEHS – “Toxic Metals in the Northeast: From Biological to Environmental Implications” Joshua Hamilton (PI), Carol Folt (Associate Director)

2000-05 NIEHS – “Trophic Transfer of Toxic Metals in Aquatic Food Webs” Carol Folt (PI), Celia Chen (Co-PI) (individual project in program)

2000-05 NIEHS – “Outreach Core: Collaborative Initiative in Middle School Science Education with the Montshire Museum of Science” Carol Folt (PI), David Goudy (Co-PI) (individual project in program)

2002 NSF – “Fate and Transfer of Metals and PCB’s in Baiyangdian Lake” Celia Chen (PI), Meixun Zhao, Carol Folt (Co-PI)

2000 TSRI (Canada) – “Multiple Stressors – Effects on Native Amphibian Species of Forested Environments” Celia Chen (PI), Carol Folt (Co-PI)

2001 United States Forest Service (USFS) – “Restoration of Atlantic Salmon to New England Streams” Carol Folt (PI)

2000 Department of Education – “Graduate Assistance in Areas of National Need” Mary Lou Guerinot (PI), Carol Folt (Co-PI)

Past grants (partial list)

1995 NIEHS – “Variation in Bioaccumulation and Biomagnification of Metals in Lakes Throughout the Northeastern Region of the U.S.A.” Carol Folt (PI), Celia Chen (Co-PI), Richard Stemberger (Co-PI)

1995 NIEHS – “Dartmouth Superfund Basic Research Grant: Toxic Metals” Joshua Hamilton (PI), Carol Folt (Associate Director)

NOAA/NMFS – “Atlantic Salmon Restoration in New England: Assessing Habitat Viability by Combining Stable Isotope Technology, Genetic Markers and Field Evaluation” Carol Folt (PI)

United States Forest Service – “A Collaborative Approach to the Restoration Ecology and Management of Juvenile Atlantic Salmon (Salmo salar) in Forested Ecosystems. Part I: Food and Energetics” Carol Folt (PI)

United States Forest Service – “Atlantic Salmon as a Model for Ecosystem Research and Management: Current Status and Future Directions for Research” Martha E. Mather (PI), Donna Parrish (Co-PI), Carol Folt (Co-PI)

Environmental Protection Agency – “Potential Effects of Global Warming on Aquatic Zooplankton” Marianne Moore (PI), Carol Folt (Co-PI)

N.E. Consortium for Undergraduate Science Education – “Mentoring Program for Women and Minorities in Science” Carol Folt (PI)

U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service – “Food, Flow and Habitat Structure: Proposal for the Analysis of Habitat Quality and Potential Recruitment of Atlantic Salmon Fry” Carol Folt (PI)

NSF – “Experimental Field Tests of the Effect of Biotic Neighborhoods on Zooplankton Dispersal” Carol Folt (PI)

NSF – “An Experimental Analysis of Neighborhood Interactions among Zooplankton” Carol Folt (PI)

NSF – “An Analysis of Neighborhood Effects in Size-Structured Zooplankton Communities” Carol Folt (PI)

TEN PEER REVIEWED ARTICLES OF PARTICULAR NOTE

  1. Gilbert-Diamond, D, Cottingham, KL, Gruber, JF, Punshon, T, Sayarath, V, Gandolfi, AJ, Baker, ER, Jackson, B, Folt, CL, and Karagas, MR. 2011. Rice consumption contributes to arsenic exposure in U.S. women. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences 108(51):20656-20660.
  2. Karimi, R, Fisher, NS, and Folt, CL. 2010. Multi-element stoichiometry in aquatic invertebrates: when growth dilution matters. American Naturalist 176(6):699-709.
  3. Karimi, R, Chen, CY, Pickhardt, PC, Fisher, NS, and Folt, CL. 2007. Stoichiometric controls of mercury dilution by growth. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences 104:7477–7482.
  4. Pickhardt, PC, Folt, CL, Chen, CY, Klaue, B, and Blum, JD. 2002. Algal blooms reduce the uptake of toxic methylmercury in freshwater food webs. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. 99(7):4419-4423.
  5. Chen, CY, Stemberger, RS, Klaue, B, Blum, JD, Pickhardt, PC and Folt, CL. 2000. Accumulation of heavy metals in food web components across a gradient of lakes. Limnology and Oceanography 45(7):1525-1536.
  6. Folt, CL, Chen, CY, Moore, MV and Burnaford, J. 1999. Synergism and antagonism among multiple stressors. Limnology and Oceanography 44(3):865-877.
  7. Folt, CL and Burns, CW. 1999. Biological drivers of plankton patchiness. Trends in Ecology and Evolution. 14(8):300-305.
  8. Kennedy, BP, Folt, CL, Blum, JD, and Chamberlain, CP. 1997. Natural isotope markers in salmon. Nature 387(6635):766-767.
  9. Moore, M, and Folt, C. 1993. Zooplankton body size and community structure: effects of thermal and toxicant stress. Trends in Ecology and Evolution 8(5):178-183.
  10. Folt, C and Goldman, CR. 1981. Allelopathy between zooplankton: a mechanism for interference competition. Science 213(4512):1133-1135.

PEER REVIEWED ARTICLES

Carnigan, CC, Cottingham, KL, Jackson, BP, Farzan FF, Gandolfi, AJ, Punshon, T, Folt, CL, and Karagas, MR. 2014. Breastfed infants have lower exposure to arsenic compared to formula-fed infants in a United States cohort. (Submitted)

Cottingham, KL, Karimi, R, Gruber, JF, Zens, MS, Sayarath, V, Folt, CL, Punshon, T, Morris, JS, and Karagas, MR. 2012. Diet and toenail arsenic concentrations in a New Hampshire population with arsenic-containing water. 2013. Nutrition Journal 12 (149).

Ward, DW, Nislow, KH, and Folt, CL. 2012. Do low-mercury terrestrial resources subsidize low-mercury growth of stream fish? Differences between species along a productivity gradient. 2012: PLOS ONE 7(11): e49582

Glaholt, SP, Chen, CY, Demidenko, E, Bugge, DM, Folt, CL and Shaw, JR. 2012. Adaptive iterative design (AID): A novel approach for evaluating the interactive effects of multiple stressors on aquatic organisms. Science of the Total Environment 432: 57-64.

Ward, DM, Mayes, B, Sturup, S, Folt, CL, and Chen, CY. 2012. Assessing element-specific patterns of bioaccumulation across New England lakes. Science of the Total Environment 421:230-237.

Gilbert-Diamond, D, Cottingham, KL, Gruber, JF, Punshon, T, Sayarath, V, Gandolfi, AJ, Baker, ER, Jackson, BP, Folt, CL, and Karagas, MR. 2011. Rice consumption contributes to arsenic exposure in U.S. women. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences 108(51):20656-20660.

Ward, DM, Nislow, KH, and Folt, CL 2011. Seasonal shift in the effects of predators on juvenile Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) energetics. Canadian Journal of Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences 68(12):2080-2089.

Karimi, R, Fisher, NS, and Folt, CL. 2010. Multi-element stoichiometry in aquatic invertebrates: when growth dilution matters. American Naturalist 176(6):699-709.

Ward, DM, Nislow, KH, and Folt, CL. 2010. Bioaccumulation syndrome: identifying factors that make some stream food webs prone to elevated mercury bioaccumulation. Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences. Volume 1195, Issue: The Year in Ecology and Conservation Biology 2010, Pages 62 – 83.

Ward, DM, Nislow, KH, Chen, CY, and Folt, CL. 2010. Rapid, efficient growth reduces mercury concentrations in stream-dwelling Atlantic salmon. Transactions of the American Fisheries Society 139 (1):1–10.

Ward, DM, Nislow, KH, Chen, CY, and Folt, CL. 2010. Reduced trace element concentrations in fast-growing juvenile Atlantic salmon in natural streams. Environmental Science and Technology 44(9):3245-3251.

Savarath, V, Karimi, R, Punshon, T, Rees, J, Folt, C, Zens, S, Flanagan, V, Baker, E, Troisi, R, Jackson, B, Korrick, S, and Karagas, M. 2009. Contribution of food borne exposure to arsenic and biomarker levels. Epidemiology 20 (6): S182.

Ward DM, Nislow, KH, and Folt, CL. 2009. Increased population density and suppressed prey biomass: relative impacts on juvenile Atlantic salmon growth. Transactions of the American Fisheries Society 138 (1): 135-143.

Kennedy, BP, Nislow, KH and Folt, CL. 2008. Habitat-medicated foraging limitations drive survival bottlenecks for juvenile Atlantic salmon. Ecology 89(9):2529-2541.

Chen, CY, Hathaway, KM, Thompson, DG, and Folt, CL. 2008. Multiple stressor effects of herbicide, pH, and food on wetland zooplankton and a larval amphibian. Ecotoxicology and Environmental Safety 71(1):209-218.

Ward, DM, Nislow, KH and Folt, CL. 2008. Predators reverse the direction of density dependence for juvenile salmon mortality. Oecologia 156(3):515-522.

Chen, CY, Pickhardt PC, Xum Q, and Folt, CL. 2008. Mercury and arsenic bioaccumulation and eutrophication in Baiyangdian Lake, China. Water, Air, & Soil Pollution 190 (1- 4):115-127.

Shaw, JR, Colbourne, JK, Davey, JC, Glaholt, SP, Hampton, TH, Chen, CY, Folt, CL and Hamilton, JW. 2007. Gene response profiles for Daphnia pulex exposed to the environmental stressor cadmium reveals novel crustacean metallothioneins. BMC Genomics 2007, 8:477.

Ward, DM, Nislow, KH and Folt, CL. 2008. Do native species limit survival of reintroduced Atlantic salmon in historic rearing streams? Biological Conservation 141(1):146-152.

Shaw, R, Glaholt, SP, Greenberg, NS, Sierra-Alvarez, R, and Folt, CL. 2007. Acute toxicity of arsenic to Daphnia pulex: influence of organic functional groups and oxidation state. Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry 26:1532-1537.

Karimi, R, Chen, CY, Pickhardt, PC, Fisher, NS, and Folt, CL. 2007. Stoichiometric controls of mercury dilution by growth. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences 104:7477–7482.

Hogan, LS, Marschall, E, Folt, CL, and Stein, RA. 2007. How non-native species in Lake Erie influence trophic transfer of mercury and lead to top predators. Journal of Great Lakes Research. 33(1):46-61.

Rees, JR, Stürup, S, Chen, C, Folt, C, and Karagas, MR. 2007. Toenail mercury and dietary fish consumption. Journal of Exposure Analysis and Environmental Epidemiology, 17(1):25- 30.

Ward, DM, Nislow, KH, Armstrong, JD, Einum, S, and Folt, CL. 2007. Is the shape of the density-growth relationship for stream salmonids evidence for exploitative rather than interference competition? Journal of Animal Ecology 76(1):135-138.

Karimi, R and Folt, CL. 2006. Beyond macronutrients: element variability and multi- element stoichiometry in freshwater invertebrates. Ecology Letters 9(12):1273-1283.

Renshaw, CE, Bostick, BC, Feng, X, Wong, CK, Winston, ES, Karimi, R., Folt, CL and Chen, CY. 2006. Impact of land disturbance on the fate of arsenical pesticides. Journal of Environmental Quality 35(1):61-67.

Shaw, JR, Dempsey, TD, Chen, CY, Hamilton, JW, and Folt, CL. 2006. Comparative toxicity of cadmium, zinc and mixtures of cadmium and zinc to daphniids. Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry 25(1):182-189.

Stürup, S, Chen, C, Jukosky, J, and Folt, C. 2005. Isotope dilution quantification of 200Hg2+ and CH3201Hg+ enriched species-specific tracers in aquatic systems by cold vapor ICPMS and algebraic de-convoluting. International Journal of Mass Spectrometry 242(2- 3):225-231.

Pickhardt, PC, Folt, CL, Chen, CY, Klaue, B, and Blum, JD 2005. Impacts of zooplankton composition and algal enrichment and on the accumulation of mercury in an experimental freshwater food web. Science of the Total Environment. 339(1-3):89-101.

Kennedy, BP, Chamberlain, CP, Blum, JD, Nislow, KH, and Folt, CL. 2005. Comparing naturally occurring stable isotopes of nitrogen, carbon and strontium as markers for the rearing locations of juvenile salmon (Salmo salar). Canadian Journal of Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences 62(1):48-57.

Chen, CY, Stemberger, RS, Kamman, NC, Mayes, BM, and Folt, CL. 2005. Patterns of Hg bioaccumulation and transfer in aquatic food webs across multi-lake studies in the northeast US. Ecotoxicology 14(1-2):135-149.

Chen, CY and Folt, CL. 2005. High plankton densities reduce mercury biomagnification. Environmental Science and Technology 39(1):115-121.

Chen, CY, and Folt, CL. 2005. High plankton abundance reduces trophic transfer of mercury. Learned Discourse. SETAC globe. May – June 2005.

Wickre JB, Karagas, MR, Folt CL, and Stürup S. 2004. Environmental exposure and fingernail analysis of arsenic and mercury in children and adults in a Nicaraguan gold mining community. Archives of Environmental Health 59(8):400-409.

Nislow, KH, Einum, S and Folt, CL. 2004. Testing predictions of the critical period for survival concept using experiments with stocked Atlantic salmon. Journal of Fish Biology 65 (Supp A), 188-200.

Kennedy, BP, Klaue, B, Blum, JD and Folt, CL. 2004. Integrative measures of consumption rates in salmon: expansion and application of a trace element approach. Journal of Applied Ecology. 41(5):1009-1020.

Chen, CY, Hathaway, KM and Folt, CL. 2004. Multiple stress effects of Vision ®, herbicide, pH, and food on zooplankton and larval amphibian species from forest wetlands. Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry. 23(4):823-831.

Nislow, KH, Sepulveda, AJ and Folt, CL. 2004. Mechanistic linkage of hydrologic regime to summer growth of age-) Atlantic salmon. Transactions of American Fisheries Society 133(1):79-88.

Quinn, MR, Feng, XH, Folt, CL, and Chamberlain, CP. 2003. Analyzing the trophic transfer of metals in stream food webs using nitrogen isotopes. Science of the Total Environment 317(1-3):73-89.

Folt, CL, Chen, CY, and Pickhardt, PC. 2002. Using plankton food web variables as indicators for the accumulation of toxic metals in fish. In: Biomarkers of Environmentally Associated Disease. Wilson, SH and Suk, WA (Eds.).

Nislow, KH, Magilligan, FJ, Folt, CL, and Kennedy, BP. 2002. Within-basin variation in the short-term effects of a major flood on stream fishes and invertebrates. J. Freshwater Ecology 17(2):305-318.

Chen, CY and Folt, CL. 2002. Ecophysiological responses to warming events by two sympatric zooplankton species. Journal of Plankton Research. 24(6):579-589.

Kennedy, BP, Klaue, A, Blum, JD, Folt, CL, and Nislow, KH. 2002. Reconstructing the lives of salmon using Sr isotopes in otoliths. Canadian Journal of Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences 59(6):925-929.

Pickhardt, PC, Folt, CL, Chen, CY, Klaue, B, and Blum, JD. 2002. Algal blooms reduce the uptake of toxic methylmercury in freshwater food webs. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. 99(7):4419-4423.

Kennedy, BP, Blum, JD, Folt, CL and Nislow, KH. 2000. Using natural strontium isotopic signatures as fish markers: methodology and application. Canadian Journal of Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences: 57(11):2280-2292.

Chen, CY and Folt, CL. 2000. Bioaccumulation and biodilution of arsenic and lead in a Freshwater Food Web. Environmental Science and Technology 34(18):3878-3884.

Chen, CY, Stemberger, RS, Klaue, B, Blum, JD, Pickhardt, PC and Folt, CL. 2000. Accumulation of heavy metals in food web components across a gradient of lakes. Limnology and Oceanography 45(7):1525-1536.

Nislow, KH, Folt, CL, and Parrish, DL. 2000. Spatially-explicit bioenergetic analysis of habitat quality for age-0 Atlantic salmon. Transactions of American Fisheries Society 129(5):1067-1081

Folt, CL and Burns, CW. 1999. Biological drivers of plankton patchiness. Trends in Ecology and Evolution. 14(8):300-305.

Nislow, KH, Folt, CL and Parrish, DL. 1999. Favorable foraging locations for young-of-the- year Atlantic salmon: application to the restoration of populations and habitats. Ecological Applications 9(3):1085-1099.

Chen, CY, Sillett, KB, Folt, CL, Whittemore, SL, and Barchowsky, A. 1999. Molecular and demographic measures of arsenic stress in Daphnia pulex. Hydrobiolgia: 401:229-238.

Folt, CL, Chen, CY, Moore, MV and Burnaford, J. 1999. Synergism and antagonism among multiple stressors. Limnology and Oceanography 44(3):865-877.

Mather, ME, Parrish, DL, Folt, CL and DeGraaf, RM. 1998. Integrating across scales: effectively applying science for the successful conservation of Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar). Canadian Journal of Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences 55(1): 1-8.

Wilzbach, MA, Mather, ME, Folt, CL, Moore, A, Naiman, RJ, Youngson, AF and McMenemy, J. 1998. Proactive responses to human impacts that balance development and Atlantic

salmon (Salmo salar) conservation: an integrative model. Canadian Journal of Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences 55(1):288-302.

Folt, CL, Nislow, KH. and Power, ME. 1998. Implications of temporal and spatial scale for Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) research. Canadian Journal of Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences 55(1):9-21.

Harrington, R, Kennedy, BP, Chamberlain, CP, Blum, KD and Folt, CL. 1998. 15N enrichment in agricultural catchments: field patterns and applications to tracking Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar). Chemical Geology 147(3-4):281-294.

Nislow, KH, Folt, C and Seandel, M. 1998. Food and foraging behavior in relation to microhabitat use and survival of age-0 Atlantic salmon. Canadian Journal of Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences 55(1):116-127.

Kennedy, BP, Folt, CL, Blum, JD, and Chamberlain, CP. 1997. Natural isotope markers in salmon. Nature 387(6635):766-767.

Chen, CY, Folt, CL and Cook, S. 1997. The potential for hybridization in freshwater copepods. Oecologia 111(4):557-564.

Moore, MV, Pace, ML, Mather, JR, Murdoch, PS, Howarth, RW, Chen, CY, Flebbe, PA, Folt, CL, Hemond, HF, and Driscoll, CT. 1997. Potential effects of climate change on freshwater ecosystems of the New England/MidAtlantic region. In: Ecosystems and Climate Change In North America: A Regional Assessment. Cushing, CE, (ed.). Wiley, Chichester, NY.

Moore, MV, Pace, ML, Mather, JR, Murdoch, PS, Howarth, RW, Folt, CL, Chen, CY. Hemond, HF, Flebbe, PA, and Driscoll, CT. 1997. Potential effects of climate change on freshwater ecosystems of the New England/MidAtlantic region. Hydrological Processes 11(8):925-947.

Chen, CY and Folt, CL. 1996. Consequences of fall warming for zooplankton overwintering success. Limnology and Oceanography 41(5):1077-1086.

Moore, MV, Folt, CL and Stemberger, RS. 1996. Consequences of elevated temperatures for zooplankton assemblages in temperate lakes. Archiv für Hydrobiolgia 135(3):289-319.

IPCC Working Group II Chapter 10 – Hydrology and Freshwater Ecology. 1996. Contributing author. In: Climate Change 1995 – Impacts, Adaptations And Mitigation Of Climate Change: Scientific-Technical Aspects. Watson, RT, Zinyowera, MC, Moss, RT and Dokken, DJ (eds.). IPCC SAR WG2 1996.

Moore, MV, Chen, CY, Driscoll, CT, Flebbe, PA, Folt, CL, Hemond, HF, Howarth, RW, Mather, JR, Murdoch, PS, and Pace, ML. 1995. Summary – New England Mid/Atlantic Region. In: Regional Assessment of Freshwater Ecosystems and Climate Change in North America. Briefing Report. McKnight, DM and Covich, AP (eds.). Published by American Society of Limnology and Oceanography and North American Benthological Society.

Folt, CL, and Schulze, PC. 1993. Spatial patchiness, individual performance and predator impacts. Oikos 68(3):560-566.

Folt, CL, Schulze, PC and Baumgartner, K. 1993. Characterizing a zooplankton neighbourhood: small scale patterns of association and abundance. Freshwater Biology 30(2):289-300.

Chen, CY and Folt, CL. 1993. Measures of food quality as demographic predictors in freshwater copepods. Journal of Plankton Research 15(11):1247-1261.

Moore, M, and Folt, C. 1993. Zooplankton body size and community structure: effects of thermal and toxicant stress. Trends in Ecology and Evolution 8(5):178-183.

Jones, M, Folt, C and Guarda, S. 1991. Characterizing individual, population and community effects of sublethal levels of aquatic toxicants: an experimental case study using Daphnia. Freshwater Biology 26(1):35-44.

Dionne, M and Folt, CL. 1991. An experimental analysis of macrophyte growth forms as fish foraging habitat. Canadian Journal of Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences 48(1):123-131.

Schulze, PC and Folt, CL. 1990. Food resources, survivorship, and reproduction of the omnivorous calanoid copepod, Epischura lacustris. Ecology 71(6):2224-2240.

Dionne, M, Butler, M and Folt, C. 1990. Plant-specific expression of antipredator behaviours by larval damselflies. Oecologia 83(3):371-377.

Folt, CL and Byron, ER. 1989. A comparison of the effects of prey and non-prey neighbors on the foraging rates of Epischura nevadensis (Copepoda:Calanoida). Freshwater Biology 21(2):283-293.

Folt, CL, Wevers, MJ, Yoder-Williams, MP, and Howmiller, RP. 1989. Field study comparing growth and viability of a population of phototrophic bacteria. Applied Environmental Microbiology 55(1):78-85.

Schulze, PC and Folt, CL. 1989. Effects of conspecifics and phytoplankton on the predation rates of the omnivorous copepods Epischura lacustris and Epischura nordenskioldi. Limnology and Oceanography 34(2):444-450.

Folt, CL, Crumpton, WC, and Goldman, CR. 1988. The consequences of food resource partitioning on size-structured zooplankton communities. Verh. Intern. Verein. Limnol. 23:315-327.

Folt, CL. 1987. The causes and consequences of zooplankton patchiness. In: Predation: Direct And Indirect Impacts On Aquatic Communities. Kerfoot, WC and Sih, A (eds.). University Press of New England.

Folt, CL. 1985. Predator efficiencies and prey risks at high and low prey density. Verh. Internat. Verein. Limnol. 22:3210-3214.

Byron, ER, Folt, CL and Goldman, CR. 1984. Copepod and cladoceran success in an oligotrophic lake. Journal of Plankton Research 6(1):45-65.

Folt, CL, Rybock, JT and Goldman, CR. 1982. The effect of prey composition and abundance on the predation rates and selectivity of Mysis relicta. Hydrobiologia 93(2):133-144.

Folt, C and Goldman, CR. 1981. Allelopathy between zooplankton: a mechanism for interference competition. Science 213(4512):1133-1135.

Threlkeld, SJ, Rybock, JT, Morgan, MD, Folt, CL, and Goldman, CR. 1978. The effects of an introduced invertebrate predator and food resource variation on zooplankton dynamics in an ultraoligotrophic lake. In: The Evolution and Ecology of Zooplankton Communities. Kerfoot, WC, (ed.). University Press of New England.

BOOKS

Writing Successful Science Proposals. Friedland, AJ and Folt, CL. Peking University Press. Chinese translation. Second Edition 2010; First edition 2000.

THESES

Folt, CL. The effects of species interactions on the feeding and mortality of zooplankton. PhD dissertation. Univ. of Calif. 144 p.

Folt, CL. The abundance and distribution of Thiopedia rosea in Zaca Lake, California. Master’s dissertation. Univ. of Calif. 116 p.

PROFESSIONAL ACTIVITIES (partial list, 2000 – present)

Competitive Grant Panels
National Science Foundation – New Centers Competitive Grants Program (Winter 2008; Spring 2010; Summer 2010)

National Science Foundation – Committee of Visitors, Review Panel for Infrastructure DEB (Summer 2003, Summer 2006)

National Science Foundation – Ecology Panel (1999-2001)
ASLO Dialog Selection/Nomination Committee: San Jose, CA (2003)

Editorial Board Experience
Oecologia – Member of Editorial Board (former)
Ecological Society of America – Member Editorial Board (former) Canadian Journal of Fisheries and Aquatic Science – Guest Editor Societas Internationale Limnologie – Guest Editor

Scientific Societies
American Association of Limnology and Oceanography ; Elected At-Large to board Ecological Society of America: Vice-chair – Aquatic section, Member Editorial Board

GRADUATE AND UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH PROJECTS ~ 100+ graduate and undergraduate students

Graduate Thesis Advisor
Chen, Celia Y. PhD. The effect of food quality on behavior, growth and population dynamics of herbivorous copepods.

Chiavelli, Deborah. PhD. The influence of host distribution and movement on colonization and population dynamics of an ectosymbiont.

Conroy, Lou-Anne. MS/MALS. Dams and rivers: a regional study of the history, politics and ecological impacts of flood control and beaver dams in Northern New England.

Darling, Ruth. PhD. The importance of prey patch composition and abundance on the foraging efficiency of planktivorous freshwater fishes.

Dionne, Michele. PhD. Littoral habitat structure and the role of macrophyte growth form in the foraging ecology of the pumpkinseed sunfish.

Karimi, Roxanne. PhD. The role of the benthic food web in the movement of toxic metals through aquatic food webs to humans.

Kennedy, Brian P. PhD. Linking Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) and their streams: chemical records of salmon habitat, performance and movements.

Nislow, Keith H. PhD. Interactive effects of habitat and prey on stream fish performance: implications for Atlantic salmon restoration in New England streams.

Olenec, Kristina Fjeld. MPH. An analysis of a public health problem. What are the human health costs of mercury exposure in-utero derived from coal combustion?

Pickhardt, Paul C. PhD. Zooplankton accumulation of trace metals: mechanisms and taxonomic consequences in freshwater pelagic systems.

Schulze, Peter C. PhD. The effects of food resources and conspecifics on the foraging, survivorship, and reproduction of the omnivorous copepod, Epischura lacustris.

Ward, Darren M. PhD. Linking density-dependent survival and growth of juvenile Atlantic salmon to their predators and prey.

Member of dissertation committees ~ 20+ PhD and MS students from Dartmouth and other institutions

Undergraduate Students including 19 honors theses and Mellon minority fellows, 15+ multi-term research projects, 10 Women-In-Science interns, > 50 multi-term research assistants

Leadership Initiatives

Chancellor Folt is leading key, student-centered initiatives across campus that advance the university’s academic excellence. Here are a few of the initiatives:

  • The Blueprint for Next is Carolina’s strategic framework that will guide the University’s decision-making during the next decade.
  • For All Kind: The Campaign for Carolina is the University’s comprehensive fundraising campaign that aims to raise $4.25 billion by Dec. 31, 2022, to foster an innovation generation prepared to lead the world to a better future through research and scholarship, example and ethos. A signature initiative of the campaign is The Carolina Edge, which seeks to raise $1 billion for undergraduate scholarships and graduate fellowships.
  • Arts Everywhere works to make arts a fundamental part of the University culture and daily life. Diverse departments, units and organizations collaborate to embed creative expression, live arts experiences and arts learning into students’ education.
  • The Three Zeros Environmental Initiative is Carolina’s integrated approach to reduce its environmental footprint through three overarching goals: net zero water usage, zero waste to landfills and net zero greenhouse gas emissions.
  • Chancellor Folt is committed to ensuring that all students, faculty and staff feel welcome on campus. Folt launched the Task Force on UNC-Chapel Hill History that is developing a comprehensive approach to curating and teaching the history of the University. Under Folt’s leadership, the University also announced a series of scholarships to honor Carolina’s bridge builders, individuals whose work, advocacy and personal example helped create a more inclusive and unified campus.
  • Chancellor Folt has championed support for veterans and military-affiliated students on campus through various programs, such as the opening of the Carolina Veterans Resource Center, UNC Core and the Student Veteran Assistance Program.